Did you know? Get some eco-friendly facts!

Recycling facts - Mixed Bag Designs Green Fundraising FactsWith several years experience in the green fundraising business, we have gathered tons of little tidbits and helpful information. We have decided to share some of these fun facts and trivia with you all as we kick of the summer! Today, we’ll give you two for the price of one, since we’re so excited about all these fun and random bits of information! So, without further ado…

Did you know?

Citywide recycling programs started in the 1890s. Although we often associate “going green” and recycling with modern, twentieth or twenty-first century lifestyle movements, citywide recycling was up and running in New York City in the 180s. Colonel George E. Waring Jr was at the start of it all when he was appointed the city’s street cleaning commissioner. He built the first facility to separate different kinds of waste for reuse and/or reselling. He then required all households to sort their waste before collecting it. Elsewhere in New York, the Benedetto family opened up the first recycling center in the United States. This center was used to collect and sell old, recycled newspapers and fabrics.

However paper and fabric recycling can be traced back even further to the 1600s in Pennsylvania. Dutch immigrant William Rittenhouse opened the first paper mill in the United States in 1690 in Pennsylvania. He set up the shop outside Philadelphia and used reused rags and fabrics to create paper for printing in the colonies.

The more you know! Keep in touch on our Mixed Bag Designs Facebook Page for our updated factoids and trivia!

1 Comment

  1. With the threat of global warming looming large, more and more people are switching over to energy-efficient appliances and environmentally-friendly products. Offices are large consumers of furniture and in keeping with the green revolution it is important that office furniture should be eco-friendly. The primary concerns to be considered when choosing eco-friendly office furniture are the choice of wood and the chemicals involved in the manufacture of the furniture.-

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